Saturday, November 14, 2009

Old Fashioned Pork Roast

Old Fashioned Pork Roast from Cook's Country - ButterYum
Oh my is this pork roast ever delicious! It's a recipe I saw being prepared on a PBS show called Cook's Country by America's Test Kitchen (from Cook's Illustrated Magazine). I knew immediately that I had to try it when Christopher Kimball declared it to be the best recipe Bridget Lancaster had ever developed.

Only one hitch to this recipe, you have to plan ahead because it takes 2 days to make**. Most of the cooking is actually done on day 1, then the roast rests in the fridge overnight, and finally the roast is sliced and briefly reheated on day 2. Great if you are expecting a large crowd and want to get a lot of the work done ahead of time.

**
Technically speaking, you can serve this roast on day one, but it will shred apart when you try to carve it. The overnight stay in the fridge does something magical to the roast that enables you to carve the most beautiful slices.

Either way, I promise this recipe is worth every minute it takes to make!


Start with a 6 pound boneless Boston Butt (also known as a Pork Shoulder Butt). I could only find one with a bone (6.5 pounds before boning). Removing the bone was much easier than I thought it would be. Click here for directions.

Once you have your boneless roast, tie it well with kitchen twine. The idea is to make the roast compact and give it a nice roast like shape (otherwise it's kind of flat and it has a hole from removing the bone). Place in a lightly oiled roasting pan.


Time to cover with a rub made from a mix of herbs, garlic, and S&P. Mmmm, the smell is fabulous!!! Now it goes into a 300F oven for 3 hours.


After 3 hours, the roasting pan is removed from the oven and the onions are added. Toss them with the rendered fat from the pan. If there isn't enough fat in the pan, drizzle with a bit of olive oil and toss to coat. Now we go back into the oven for an additional 4 hours (still at 300F).

Yes, that's a total of 7 hours in the oven. This is a long, slow braise... resulting in the most tender pork imaginable (my hubby said it was as tender as prime rib - obviously it won't taste like prime rib, but you get the point).

Caution - make sure you have lots of yummy food prepared to feed your family while this is roasting because the smell is going to drive them bonkers all day long!



Here's what it will look like after 7 hours. Oh how I wish you could get a whiff - the onions are uber caramelized and the smell is utterly amazing!!


Remove the roast to a glass baking dish and allow it to cool before you wrap the dish well with plastic and put it in the fridge overnight.


You want to reserve the onions and pan drippings separately in the fridge overnight too. You should have about 1 1/2 cups of drippings (maybe 1 1/4 after you remove the fat). Add water to the drippings if you don't have enough.


About an hour before you want to serve this yummy roast, preheat your oven to 300F, remove the twine from your roast and start slicing it into 1/4-inch slices. This took no time using an electric knife.


"Shingle" the slices in a large casserole dish. Pour about 1/2 cup of the reserved pan drippings over the slices and cover with foil. Reheat for about 45 minutes. CI suggested preparing a gravy from the leftover drippings (recipe below), but I preferred the pan drippings straight from the pan.


Season individual servings with salt and pepper and enjoy!
I served this roast with mashed potatoes and oven roasted Brussels sprouts.




Old Fashioned Pork Roast
(adapted from The Complete Cook's Country TV Show Cookbook)
Makes enough to feed 10-12 hungry guests

6 pound boneless Boston Butt (aka pork shoulder)
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Kosher salt
2 teaspoons ground pepper
1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
2 large red onions, sliced into 1-inch thick wedges
Olive oil (for roasting pan and possibly needed to coat onions)
1/2 cup reserved pan drippings

Tie roast well with kitchen twine and place it in a lightly oiled roasting pan.  Rub roast with mix of herbs and garlic.  Pop it into a 300F oven for 3 hours, uncovered.  Remove from oven and add onions; toss with pan drippings.  If there isn't enough fat in the pan, drizzle with a bit of olive oil and toss onions to coat.  Pop everything back in the 300F oven, again uncovered, for an additional 4 hours (check pan every hour to be sure the pan drippings don't evaporate - add 2 cups of water if necessary).  Remove the roast from the roasting pan and place it in a glass baking dish and allow it to cool before you wrap the dish well with plastic and put it in the fridge overnight.  Reserve the onions and pan drippings separately in the fridge overnight too. You should have about 1 1/2 cups of drippings (maybe 1 1/4 after you remove the fat). Add water to the drippings if you don't have enough. 

About an hour before you want to serve this yummy roast, preheat your oven to 300F, remove the twine from your roast and start slicing it into 1/4-inch slices.  "Shingle" the slices in a large casserole dish. Pour about 1/2 cup of the reserved pan drippings over the slices and cover with foil. Reheat for about 45 minutes. CI suggested preparing a gravy from the leftover drippings (recipe below), but I preferred the pan drippings straight from the pan.  Season individual servings with salt and pepper and enjoy!


Sauce from the pan drippings
makes approximately 1 cup

remaining pan drippings (fat removed)
reserved roasted onions
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup apple jelly
1 cup apple cider

Heat in a saucepan over med-high heat for 15-20 minutes until reduced and thickened. Strain onions and serve.

Note: this sauce recipe has a vinegary flavor that I wasn't very fond of. I much preferred the pan drippings straight from the roasting pan, but I might have liked it without the vinegar.

I also think that this recipe would be just fine without the sage and rosemary, so if you're in a hurry, or don't want to pay $6 for fresh herbs, feel free to make it using only garlic, salt, and pepper.  Enjoy!





44 comments:

  1. It is hard to go wrong with the Test Kitchen helping you out! Great recipe - and I love the prospect of having the main entree basically done the day before! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Is the the one you took the bone out for in an earlier post? If so, I have been anxiously awaiting it and will definitely be having it for dinner next week!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh my goodness...this looks too delicious! I am writing it down right now. Thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is just the recipe I needed...I have a roast in the freeze and didn't want to crock pot cook it this time,....I usually do pork in the crock pot overnight using saurkraut as a base...but I wanted to bake the roast for a crispy crust ontop....this looks amazing...SO it's coming out of the freezer tonight...thanks so much for the recipe....

    ReplyDelete
  5. OMG!! This is so mouthwatering!!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. This is the most heavenly post. YOur pictures are making my mouth water, no I mean it!
    This roast is the way I love them, slow roasted, brown, and delicious with lots of flavor. YOu did a stellar job! I love to come visit, it is always such a treat! Thanks.
    Now off to eat my take-out dinner (UGH).
    Yvonne

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow! This looks heavenly. I am making a pork roast today also...I am liking your recipe better but I don't have two days! Net time.

    ReplyDelete
  8. We love roast pork and this looks worth every minute of the effort.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Please please post this recipe to the Its So Very Creative party.

    cheri

    ReplyDelete
  10. OMGoodness! This sounds and looks amazing!! I would do anything to try this right now, lol. You have a lot of incredible ideas on here! I feel so inspired. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I am making this pronto! Looks so yummy and easy -- if you can wait for it!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Patricia this is awesome! I might as well just save your whole blog, because I love everything on it.

    Oh and I love your counters.

    Well ok that's a give-in.

    Laura

    ReplyDelete
  14. That looks INCREDIBLE!!!! Must try!!!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Mmmm . . . this look so good. Everytime I see shoulder roasts on sale I always pick up one or two for the freezer, they're my favorite! My husband just smoked our last one last weekend, delicious!

    Got your note about the caramelized onion marmalade. Yes, separate the rings out a bit, just with your fingers when moving them from the cutting board to the crockpot, but don't worry too much about the details as they will separate a bit on their own during cooking time. I hope this helps and let me know how it goes!

    Thanks also for your lovely comment on my bread!

    Best,
    Sarah

    ReplyDelete
  16. Can I have some of that right now???? Pretty Please??? Oh you are really making me hungry!! Shame on you!
    Mama Holli

    ReplyDelete
  17. i am having pork this weekend, you are making hard to wait that long...

    ReplyDelete
  18. Oh my goodness!! This looks soooo good. I'm copying your recipe down - I love a good pork roast! And you cooked your Brussels sprouts exactly the way I love them. Perfect!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Roast Pork is my absolute favourite! I have never carved it the day after though, so this is a really helpful tip-thank you so much for sharing it.
    Best wishes, Natasha.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I love any recipe that I can serve to my company that does not require me to be at the stove when they are at my home. I just copied this one and will make it before my guests come for dinner over the holidays. I guess I can serve it on day 3 instead of day two which will work out great for me.
    Joyce

    ReplyDelete
  21. Boy, oh boy! This looks splendid. Your photography is a match for this wonderful recipe.
    Thanks for sharing this with us.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I saw this Cooks Country episode. Oh, my...this looks like heaven. I think my family would mutany on me if I told them that TOMORROWS dinner was what smelled so good, lol. You did a great job, We love roasted brussel sprouts too. Perfect meal :)

    Blessings!
    Gail

    ReplyDelete
  23. What a WONDERFUL!!! recipe. Looks and sounds AWESOME!!!
    Geri

    ReplyDelete
  24. I love Pork Roast! I love blogs that feature Pork Roast! Therefore I love your blog! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Wow that looks great. Your pictures tell it all. I love the smell of pork in the oven. Can't wait to try your recipe:)

    ReplyDelete
  26. I just wanted to let you know I made this for Christmas eve dinner and it turned out wonderfully. Even the sauce turned out great! I think I will make this an annual tradition.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Oh Wow David - thanks so much for letting me know! I could drink the sauce for lunch - haha.

    :)
    ButterYum

    ReplyDelete
  28. I am on day 2 of this -- my pan dripping completely hardened -- does that mean the whole thing is fat? What do I do? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi Kristin - thanks for visiting my blog. I'm so glad to hear your trying the old fashioned pork roast. The pan drippings firm up in the fridge because of the high gelatin content. Don't worry, it will liquefy when heated. You can zap it in the microwave if you need to.

    :)
    ButterYum

    PS - I hope you'll let me know how it turns out for you.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Just found this recipe, looks great! However I'm cooking for two, so I got a 3 lb roast instead...would my cooking time be cut in half do you think...only 3.5 hours? I'm confused :)

    ReplyDelete
  31. Hi Holly - oh gosh, that's a really good question.... not real sure how to answer it.

    Yes, I think I'd try cutting the total cooking time in half to make a 3 pound roast. If you find it's not tender enough at the end of the reduced cooking time, simply put it back in the oven until it meets your expectations.

    I hope it works well for your. Please let me know how it turns out!!

    :)
    ButterYum

    ReplyDelete
  32. Just beautiful. I see it is "PINK." What temperature does it get to? I am such a scare-dy cat when it comes to pork. I would love to make this. I never make pork roast b/c it's just kind of "blah." This looks worth it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The pink is just from the poor nighttime lighting in my kitchen, and my bad camera skills at that time. Trust me, after 7 hours roasting at 300F, IT'S DONE!! (and yes, the results are worth the effort - be sure to plan ahead)

      Delete
  33. STOP! You are an amazing photographer. Your pictures make my mouth water. Okay. It's going on the menu and I'm sure I will thank you! (Going to Costco for the FIRST time tomorrow - are you happy for me??? Hee, hee! Cento San Marzanos on the list :-) Please keep saying what's from Costco!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whoo-hoo - I hope you like it as much as I do. I would live there if I could ;). Sadly, my Costco stopped carrying the San Marzanos, so now I have to drive to the Costco an hour away to get them.

      Some of my other favorite things to get there are: jarred sun-dried tomatoes, prunes, all kinds of nuts, fresh mozzarella, Greek yogurt (Kirkland brand), smoked salmon, all kinds of fabulous produce, olive oil, Italian bread, parmesan, romano, salami etc. etc. etc. I had to stop buying the guacamole and artichoke dip - I can't stay away from the stuff!

      I hope you have big closets and a big freezer (and an army to feed). Happy shopping!!

      :)

      Delete
  34. Costco was great! I'm keeping track of what you listed as good to buy! Thanks. They only had some odd, large cans of San Marzano called Nina and they were from the "region" and in tomato puree with salt and basil added. Boo hoo! I want the real deal. The pork shoulders were enormous. I'm going to have to make this for company, but I'll report back when I do!!! Thanks SO much!

    ReplyDelete
  35. I tried this and my onions burned! Was your pan left uncovered the whole 7 hours?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so sorry that happened to you, Robin. Yes, the roast is uncovered for the whole 7 hours. I recently purchased the cookbook and consulted the official recipe (something I didn't have when I published this post 3 years ago). It says after the onions are added to the roasting pan, check every hour to be sure the pan drippings don't evaporate; add 2 cups of water if necessary.

      Delete
  36. Thanks, I'll try it again!

    ReplyDelete
  37. I found a pork shoulder for .79 a pound today so I grabbed it and started the recipe today. It's finishing up in the oven as we speak and can't wait for dinner tomorrow! Thanks for the heads up about their gravy recipe. I think I will just thicken the pan juices. Also, great directions for deboning the roast. I never did that before and will never again pay extra for a boned shoulder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, what a deal - fantastic! I hope you like this roast as much as I do, and I'm happy you found the instructions helpful. Do report back and let me know how you like it. Take care, Patricia

      Delete

Thanks for visiting!